Photos from Beachville Hike

IDNC enjoyed a great hike along The Thames River at Beachville on January 19th. Thanks to Ken Westcar, Oxford County Trails Council, for the guided tour, outlining work done by volunteers and future plans. Thanks, also, to Ingersoll‚Äôs Chocolatea for their delicious hot chocolate that warmed 18 hardy souls at the end!!! Best sighting of the day – a bald ūü¶Ö eagle!

Photo credit – Bill Grant, Club Member
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Bill 66: Important Updates and Actions

Recently, we received an email from Ontario Nature, discussing Bill 66 (Restoring Ontario’s Competitiveness Act):

Dear Carolinian West Nature Network Members,

As most of you are likely aware, Bill 66 (Restoring Ontario’s Competitiveness Act) passed first reading on December 6th, 2018. If passed, this legislation would trump critical environmental protections for land, water and wildlife throughout Ontario. There is a serious misconception that the overriding of environmental protections that this Bill enables is confined largely to the Greater Golden Horseshoe Greenbelt and surrounding areas. This is not true. It affects all municipalities in Ontario and all of your communities.

There are some very important deadlines that you should be aware of:

‚Äʬ†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† January 20th: Deadline for comments on Bill 66 through the Environmental Registry for Ontario (ERO postings were previously referred to as EBR postings).

‚Äʬ†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† Bill 66 is on the order paper for second reading on February 19th when the Legislature returns.

‚Äʬ†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬†¬† After passing second reading, Bill 66 goes to committee. So the anticipated third reading and passage of the Bill is early March.

Further Action: Read Ontario Nature’s blog post which¬†which explains the very serious environmental implications of Bill 66: What You Need to Know: (https://ontarionature.org/bill-66-facts/). Sign the online letter that is being sent to Premier Ford, Todd Smith (Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade) who introduced the Bill, Steve Clark (Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing) and Rod Phillips (Minister of Environment, Conservation and Parks) and to share the blog with your networks.

IDNC Annual Christmas Bird Count at the Lawson Nature Reserve.

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Thanks are extended to the eight club members who participated in this year’s annual Christmas Bird Count, held on December 28. Sightings of 15 species from the two-hour walk are noted below along with count numbers from December 2017, for comparison.

Species

2018

2017

American Goldfinch

35

17

Northern Cardinal

13

9

Dark-Eyed Junco

7

36

American Tree Sparrow

0

1

Brown Creeper

0

2

White-breasted Nuthatch

11

9

Black-capped Chickadee

43

23

American Crow

5

3

Blue Jay

5

18

Mourning Dove

1

11

Canada Geese

45

22

Herring Gull

1

0

Hairy Woodpecker

1

0

Downy Woodpecker

12

9

Red-bellied Woodpecker

3

4

Ducks (unidentified)

15

0

Red-tailed Hawk

1

0

 

IDNC Hosts Festive Social

 

The Ingersoll District Nature Club enjoyed an informative afternoon at the Festive Social on November 25th.

Winnie Wake from Nature London provided an overview of the plight of chimney swifts in our area, citing food shortage, habitat loss and climate change as impacting the endangered status of these mysterious little birds.  Amazing aerial acrobats, chimney swifts have adapted over time from living in hollow trees to building chimneys.  Listen for their distinctive sound at dusk in late spring, early summer during mating season in downtown Ingersoll.  Following Winnie, Debbie Lefebvre, Swift Care Ontario, provided engaging stories about her rehabilitation efforts with injured chimney swifts.  Thanks are also extended to Hannah Bosma and Taylor Brackenbury, students from Aylmer High School’s Environmental Program who attended Ontario Nature’s 2018 Fall Youth Summit.  They regaled attendees with stories of the fun they had while learning more about the environment, and opportunities for advocacy.  Hannah and Taylor were sponsored by IDNC.

Activities for 2019 will follow before the end of the year.  Be sure to visit our website for updates.

Lace up and explore 19 awesome hiking trails

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The Lawson Nature Reserve was recently featured on Ontario Southwest’s website:

Whether you choose from 9 trails in our eastern area or 10 trails in our western area, we’ve got routes to suit hikers and nature walkers of all skill levels from little feet to seasoned trekkers. Find fresh air fun, spectacular fall colours, stunning sunsets, fascinating wildlife and more in Ontario’s southwest this fall.

HIKE ONTARIO’S SOUTHWEST

Join Us October 6 for Our Fungus Walk

[W] Oct  6 РFungus Walk / 1:30 p.m. Meet at Lawson Reserve (Date change)

Naturalist and fungi expert Inga Hinnerichsen will lead the tour and identify the various fungus at the Lawson Nature Reserve.   Fungi are different from animals and plants.  A fungus breaks down dead organic matter around it, and uses it as food. For the longest time they were considered plants, but in the late 1960’s they were classified as their own Kingdom. It is estimated that there are over a million species of fungi worldwide. Come see what the Lawson Nature Reserve has to offer in this fascinating world.

Contact:  Peter  519-425-0429

IDNC Visits Rondeau Park

Seven IDNC members made their way to Rondeau for Migratory Bird Day on May 12th .  Despite torrential rains, the group persevered and recorded 30 different species of birds, listed here.  One of the highlights was discovering a bay-breasted warbler, feasting on the ground with a juicy find Рsee warbler photos, credited to club member Bill Grant.

  • Baltimore Oriole (male & female)
  • Bay-breasted Warbler
  • Bluejay
  • Brown-headed Cowbird
  • Cardinal
  • Catbird
  • Chestnut-sided Warbler
  • Common Yellow Throated Warbler (male & female)
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Goldfinch
  • Grackle
  • Grosbeak (male & female)
  • Heron (Blue)
  • Heron (Gray)
  • Hummingbird
  • Magnolia Warbler
  • Mourning Dove
  • Red Bellied Woodpecker
  • Redstart
  • Red-winged Blackbird
  • Robin
  • Sparrow (Chipping)
  • Sparrow (House)
  • Sparrow (White Crowned)
  • Sparrow (White-throated)
  • Thrush (Gray)
  • Thrush (Swainson)
  • Thrush (Wood)
  • Towhee
  • Turkey Vulture
  • White-eyed Vireo
  • Wild Turkey
  • Yellow WarblerRondeau 1 Grosbeak2M7A2377a62M7A2368a62M7A2363a 62M7A2340a62M7A2329b62M7A2312a62M7A2272a62M7A2232a62M7A2213a62M7A2199a62M7A2197a62M7A2194a6Rondeau 3_Tulip TrailRondeau 4_Tulip TrailRondeau 2_Visitors Centre